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Restoring our nature

Wildlife Healing and Recovery Village

The Restoring our Nature phase of the campaign will design, permit, and build state-of-the-art wildlife healing enclosures to replace the decades old and outdated existing enclosures on the former York Water District property, and completely restore our former and leased property back to natural habitat.  These enclosures are the last step that an injured or orphaned wild animal need in order to return back to the wild.  Just like we need to rebuild muscle, wake up digestive systems, or recover in a safe environment from fractures, head or eye trauma, or other medical issues, wild animals need the same.  Once they have moved through exam, diagnostics, medical treatment and supportive care, hand-feeding, and proper nutrition depending on their reason for admission, they need to go through assessment and care in an outdoor enclosure that mimics their natural environments. 
 

Center for Wildlife’s new enclosures will allow us to:

  • Mitigate wildlife’s current challenges, allowing for more resilient wildlife communities and ecosystems in the face of a changing climate and rapid development

  • Document impacts of toxins in the environment including heavy metals and rodenticide

  • Help restore threatened, endangered, and species of special concern populations throughout ME and NH

  • Contribute missing baseline data on diet, behavior, habitat, and medical needs for 190 different species in New England

  • Provide education and hands-on experience for the next generation of wildlife biologists, ecologists, policymakers and veterinarians

  • Inform policy on response to emergent disease along with closing loopholes on allowances for toxins in the environment

  • Contribute to human health via improved ecosystem health, access and connection to nature

Our Goal for Current Phase:

$650,000

Currently Raised:

$315,000

Goals of our Restoring our Nature Campaign:
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Research & Design:
new outdoor recovery and rehabilitation enclosures to serve 2,500-3,500 injured and orphaned wild animals onsite annually representing 190 different species of birds, small mammals, reptiles and amphibians
 
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Site Work:
prepare building sites for predator proofing and proper drainage, considering ledge, surrounding vernal pools and setbacks, along with the Planning Board regulations for final occupancy permit
Construction:
construct and install utilities for up to 25 separate outdoor enclosures and maintenance vestibules to offer all phases of rehabilitation including restricted movement, waterproofing retention, enabling natural behaviors and assessment, hunting, foraging, climbing, and more for all species treated
Equipment & Husbandry:
pools, filtration systems, perching, cover and maintainable natural history items for reducing stress and enhancing recovery along with equipment to clean and maintain buildings and items
Restoration:
restore 385 Mountain Road back to natural per Purchase and Sales agreement.  This includes removal of all buildings and equipment, installing natural berms to maintain watershed quality and restrictions, and conservation seed mix to facilitate return to native forest composition
Maintenance Building:
storage and workspace to maintain up to 40 patient and ambassador enclosures, the campus and facilitate workdays and volunteer support
Trails & Landscaping:
installation of remaining trails and boardwalks to foster nature connection, empathy and stewardship for up to 20,000 visitors annually.  Installation of trails to allow volunteer and staff access to enclosures all seasons.  Complete native landscaping design to fulfill final Occupancy Permit per York Planning Board requirements.

Contact Carolyn to set up a tour and discuss a major gift or naming opportunity today! 

HELP US MEET OUR GOAL!

Gift Information:

207-361-1400 ext. 108

Via Website:  Click here

Via Mail: Center for Wildlife, P.O. Box 620, Cape Neddick ME 03902 (Restoring our Nature Campaign in Memo)

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Why?
In the past several years our communities have undergone significant change and challenges: extreme weather events, emergent disease, along with rapid development of natural resources due to an influx of people moving from cities or other areas of our country due to loss of habitable or desirable property.  While we experience these challenges, alongside us are the wild animals that balance insect populations, bring us immense joy and wonder, plant our trees and keep diseases at bay.  We are proud to have been treating injured and orphaned wildlife since 1986, and a leader in our field transitioning from wildlife rehabilitation to systemic change through the practice of conservation medicine.  Since our inception, we have provided care to over 73,000 local wildlife representing 190 different species.  Each animal that comes to us provides a window into the health of their species, habitat, local populations, nesting and migration patterns, and so much more.

When?
We are in the last phase of our multi-year and multi-million dollar capital campaign.  This ambitious campaign was a necessity, as we could no longer operate and fund ourselves out of a donated ranch house and older outbuildings.  We began with our most immediate need:  indoor and appropriate space for wildlife medical treatment, nature center and immersive environmental education, intern housing and earned income opportunities.  Next up we transitioned our beloved ambassadors to our new campus, planted pollinator and native species, and added food and pollinator gardens.  We have most recently been working to create trails and boardwalks accessible to all, remove the former building from the York Water District property, and install new utilities in preparation for the final phase of the campaign.  We are proud to say, we are finally here and ready to kick off the final phase, and the timing is right as we need to completely vacate the York Water District property by May 2025.  

What?
This last phase of the campaign will design, permit, and build state-of-the-art wildlife rehabilitation enclosures to replace the 20-30 year old existing enclosures on the former York Water District property, and completely restore our former and leased property back to natural habitat.  These enclosures are the last step that an injured or orphaned wild animal needs in order to return back to the wild.  Just like we need to rebuild muscle, wake up digestive systems, or recover in a safe environment from fractures, head or eye trauma, or other medical issues, wild animals need the same.  Once they have moved through exam, diagnostics, medical treatment and supportive care, hand-feeding, and proper nutrition depending on their reason for admission, they need to go through assessment and care in an outdoor enclosure that mimics their natural environments. 

By a peregrine falcon flying freely in a 75-foot flight enclosure, our Wildlife Specialists can see if they have stamina, can avoid obstacles, and hunt for themselves in order to survive once released back to the wild.  Or a Virginia opossum mother hit by a car can raise her joeys in a natural environment and we can see that she maintains a fear response to predators and that her head trauma is not impacting motor skills or cognitive function.  Gannets, loons, dovekies and so many other waterbirds and seabirds can dive, preen, avoid pressure sores and more from being in a properly filtrated pool before returning to their ocean or lake.  And turtles, snakes and amphibians which are some of our most threatened and endangered species will have a dedicated space outside of the indoor rooms to recover and return to contribute to their critical populations. 
 

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