WHY WILDLIFE RESEARCH?

We've admitted over 10,000 animals since 2010 alone.  Having our "hands" on so many local wildlife gives us a unique window into the region's overall health and current challenges in real time.  Baseline, illness/disease, and introduced challenge data collecting allows us to see trends over time, and begin to inform and assist local community leaders, wildlife management agencies, landowners, and land trusts with conservation and protection efforts.  Some of our data has been used to:
 

  • Educate local groups such as Rotarians or Audubon Societies on the effects of domestic cats on local wildlife

  • Assist a conservation commission's effort to ban the use of rodenticides in their town

  • Provide compelling data on changing nesting seasons in our region for large scale conservation efforts

  • Track historic and missing data of hibernating and maternity locations for local (imperiled) bat species

Time and resources to perform research can be challenging, but partnerships, grants, and restricted funding has helped us create several research projects.  These projects contribute to the greater wildlife medical care field, can improve patient care, and can help spread awareness or ultimately hopefully prevent injuries and illness to local wildlife at the hands of humans.  Here are a few of our past and current projects. 

SURVIVABILITY OF A ONE-EYED OWL

In partnership with Biodiversity Research Institute, we placed a radio-transmitter on a rehabilitated great horned owl that had lost vision in one eye. Through this study we learned that she was able hunt and survive through the harshest season, and also about the movements of a coastal, island-dwelling owl. 

REGIONAL NORTH AMERICAN PORCUPINE RESEARCH

The field of wildlife rehabilitation has evolved dramatically just over the past decade.  As exciting as this can be, this means there are not many resources available on "normal" parasite loads, sensitivity to medications, etc. for the  species that we treat. Together with the NH Veterinary Diagnostics Lab at UNH, we've been collecting baseline data on North American porcupines over the past decade.  Watch for a journal study publication over the next year!

WILD-ONE DATABASE OF NORTH AMERICA

Wildlife rehabilitators have access to the highest abundance and diversity of wildlife species of any government, academic, or non-profit organization in North America. However, historic non-standardization meant that the data could not be utilized.  Center for Wildlife is one of 89 organizations, in 4 countries, collecting aggregate data on 970 species.  Click here to learn more. 

 

kEEP AN EYE OUT FOR UPCOMING
RESEARCH PROJECTS!

Physical Address

385 Mountain Road, Cape Neddick, ME 03902

Mailing Address

P.O. Box 620, Cape Neddick, ME 03902

Call Us

(207) 361-1400

Email

info@thecenterforwildlife.org