Wildlife emergency

WILDLIFE ASSISTANCE HOTLINE

(207) 361-1400

MEDICAL CLINIC HOURS

Daily: 9-5PM

Upon arrival, our Specialists will meet you outside and take over handling of the animals from there!

I've found an injured animal.

What do I do next?

Our Wildlife Specialists will talk you through the process of safely handling and transporting animals to our facility.

Center for Wildlife does not provide pickup and transport for animals.

It's time to take action!

Remember, you are not alone. Our Wildlife Specialists are available to provide guidance and instruction for the safe capture and transport to our clinic.

 

Just call our Wildlife

Assistance Hotline!

1.

3.

a few things to remember:

Do not attempt to feed

wild animals, they may not be stable enough for nutrition and the wrong food may harm digestive processes.

All mammals can carry rabies or potential zoonotic diseases. if you suspect an animal is rabid, call your town's animal control officer for help.

2.

Animals can suffer from a wide variety of injuries, illnesses and diseases. proper diagnosis from our trained professionals is the best path to recovery

Not all young animals are orphaned. mom may be nearby or out collecting food!

4.

ANIMALS WE ACCCEPT​

ALL WILD BIRDS

No turkeys from outside the state of Maine.

ALL WILD AMPHIBIANS AND REPTILES

THE FOLLOWING MAMMALS

Bats*

Chipmunk

Moles/Voles

Opossum

Porcupine

Rabbit

Squirrel

*No bats from outside the state of Maine

ANIMALS WE DO NOT ACCCEPT​

Fox

Raccoon

Skunk

Woodchuck

Beaver

Coyote

Deer

Moose

Bobcat/Lynx

Bear

Fisher

Marine Mammals

Mice/Rats

Domestic Animals

We are happy to refer you to a colleague that specializes in these animals when you call our Wildlife Assistance Hotline or have a look at the list of permitted rehabilitators below.

Center for Wildlife is a private, non-profit organization whose mission is to cultivate and strengthen relationships between humans, wildlife and the environment resulting in a healthier, more sustainable community. Our first goal in fulfilling this mission is to strengthen our community’s overall health through the interdisciplinary approach of conservation medicine. Conservation medicine combines veterinary medicine and natural history to return local wildlife to their ecosystems, utilizing patient information to support conservation efforts, and contributing data to the study of health relationships at the wildlife, human, environmental junction. 

Wildlife and the environment are our collective responsibility, yet non-profits in these fields receive just

1-3% of charitable giving annually. We partner closely with state and federal agencies along with other non-profits to all provide a piece of the wildlife and environmental conservation puzzle. To better focus our limited resources on medical treatment and rehabilitation for injured and orphaned wild animals with the goal of release, we empower and rely on the public to rescue and transport animals they have found to our facility. 

The Center services a 100-mile radius of York, ME. If our staff or volunteers left to pick up animals within our service area, we would be unable to provide the highest levels of care to the 30-40 patients we receive daily. We would also be unable respond to the 50-60 calls our Wildlife Assistance Hotline receives on a daily basis. 

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Our first owlet of the season! This barr

2,000 

animals treated annually

1,020

birds

900

mammals

80

reptiles

Squirrell_edited.png

15,000

phone calls fielded annually through our wildlife assistance hotline

190

different species treated annually